Alternatives to Torque for engines that include networking?

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by sofakng, Jan 21, 2009.

  1. sofakng

    sofakng New Member

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    I'm thinking about purchasing TGEA (Torque Game Engine Advanced) but before I purchased it I was wondering if any other engines exist that include built-in networking like TGE/TGEA.

    For example, TGE/TGEA automatically synchronizes clients, player position, etc.

    I believe that Unity3D (which is coming to Windows very soon) has somewhat similar features but not nearly as advanced of networking as TGE/TGEA.
     
  2. Backov

    Original Member

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    If you think Torque is going to magically solve your games networking problems - you're right, as long as you're building Tribes or something like it.
     
  3. Acord

    Acord New Member

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    Don't. You will regret it.

    What kind of game are you looking to make with it? That's probably a more important question to ask.
     
  4. sofakng

    sofakng New Member

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    Don't what? :)

    I'm looking to make an isometric-style game similar to Neverwinter Nights or Final Fantasy Tactics. However, I'd like to game to be multiplayer thus the reason for Torque (or a similar) game engine.
     
  5. defanual

    Original Member

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    I think he means don't buy TGEA, he's not a big fan of Garage games ;)

    I couldn't be specific on a particular engine to go for in regard to your needs or experience level but I've found devmaster a useful resource (although be sure to check out the website of the engine as some items maybe out of date feature list wise). Anyway, assuming your not already familiar with it, here's the link http://www.devmaster.net/engines/ Pay special attention to the sidebar links on the right. Hope maybe this helps you a little...
     
  6. Greg Squire

    Original Member

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    You might want to look into Unity3D. Right now the development platform is Mac only, but a Windows version is supposed to come out next month.
     
  7. Tony Richards

    Tony Richards New Member

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    TGEA networking is not as advanced as people make it out to be.

    Object replication should be customized specifically for your game... you should start with some nice building blocks and build up from there instead of starting with the FPS specific implementation that is part of the Torque + FPS Starter Kit.

    These are the types of things that you don't find out until after you've made the purchase, and even then you have to figure it out for yourself because the documentation doesn't say anything about that.

    If you can code C++ then I recommend starting with the Zen Engine game engine framework. (Full disclaimer: I'm one of the developers so be sure to evaluate it for yourself.) You can't beat the FOSS non-copyleft ZLib license. :p
     
  8. gijoejk

    gijoejk New Member

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    Do not buy TGEA! Instead just wait for Unity3D 2.5 to come out and then compare the demos!

    I have been using TGEA for about 8 months now for my game;

    www.rocketeergames.com

    But I'm NOT happy with TGEA's spaghetti code and shader pipeline, and will most likely be making the switch to Unity3D pro as soon as it comes out. I know of many other TGEA devs who will also be making the switch...

    Good luck!:)
     

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