Absolute beginner using Blitz3D...

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by Reactor, Apr 23, 2005.

  1. Reactor

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Hi guys, I'm looking into learning Blitz3D. It looks quite solid (graphics wise) and fairly fast to work with. But, I know absolutely nothing at all about programming. In fact when I was in school, I couldn't avoid maths fast enough.

    So I'm crazy.

    Anyhow, I've been getting a few lessons from my brother (who programmed our first game) and who supports the idea of learning something like Blitz, for tool and basic game creation. I really want to succeed at getting into it, so I'm more or less asking on here to obtain any words of wisdom. I know about the tutorials on Blitzbasic.com and Blitzcoder.com, and I've found quite a few good maths websites that teach on cos, sin and... well, a whole host of other things I'll no doubt need. I know quite a few of you guys use Blitz, so... any advice, or pointers would be appreciated.

    And hopefully, if someone else comes by this forum looking for a way to start making games, they can be directed to this thread. Thanks.
     
  2. digriz

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    Oh man, have you picked a subject to learn!

    I know nothing about Blitz3D, so i'm pretty much clueless about that piece of software.

    The only thing i can suggest is to look on places like www.gamedev.net or www.flipcode.com or even www.codeproject.com.

    They are all good resources to learn about 3d theories. This forum isn't really set up to teach you how to program though.
     
  3. Robert Cummings

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    Hi,

    Blitz3D is great for starting out. You will be far more at home with it than C++ or similar development environment, as like you say, you know nothing about making games. Some advice:

    * Avoid socialising on the blitz forums, you'll get sucked into a time wasting loop. Instead when you ask questions over there, keep it very simple and brief.

    * Use the IRC chat channel for fairly good support : irc.blitzed.org on channel #blitzbasic

    * Learn what indenting is, and how to capitalise variable names "meaningful variable names" and "indenting code". Very helpful.

    * Understand how functions help you break up your code into smaller bite sized chunks so you can use these functions as 'tools' to build your game.

    * Start with a simple getting used to things game exercise. Make many demos that interest you, and don't try to be too ambitious. When you have a feel for things, then plan your goals.

    This forum isn't a support group for blitz and you won't get much help here outside C++ programming as it is mainly a forum for indie game development, and information exchange.
     
  4. ManuelFLara

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    Man, I just couldn't believe it when I saw THAT many blitz users coding without indenting anything.. just crazy.
     
  5. Reactor

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Sure, thanks guys. I realise this forum isn't a place for Blitz help... just thought I should ask once. My brother won't let me get away with sloppy code, so I'm pretty much confident I'll do things the right way. I appreciate the links and tips though!
     
  6. matthew180

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    Get and read Code Complete:

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...f=sr_1_1/102-5820991-1876126?v=glance&s=books

    That book will give you a very good foundation for code organization, commenting, variable and procedure naming, etc.. It won't teach you how to code though, for that you need to get a good introduction to programming book. I can't really recommend any since the one I used came with my TI-99/4A computer back in 1983... ;-) I taught myself BASIC, then jumped to assembly, which is *not* as hard as everyone thinks it is. I'm glad I did learn assmebly because it gives you a very good understanding of what is really going on inside the computer, and lays a very good foundation for understanding other languages.

    No matter what languages you decide to learn, programming in general is computer and language agnostic, i.e. all languages have decision commands, loops, variables, etc.. So, learn the foundations of programming and you can pick up pretty much any language.

    Matthew
     
  7. Sharpfish

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    Agreed! I first started programming (simple stuff) back in the mid 80s on a ZX Spectrum In Basic (and that was real basic basic ;) - then via the Amiga > Basic - AMOS (Again Basic but pretty powerful at the time) then I dabbled (very briefly) with C and assembly - nothing much came of it. I left it all behind for some years and when I came back ready to code again, I went straight for the big one (C++). I was suprised at how much is very similar even to basic all those years ago. Of course there is a world of difference between them in the details (memory managment, pointers, classes etc) but from a game logic point of view it is pretty much the same ifs/fors/thens/elses.

    I never looked at Dark Basic (or any basic since AMOS in 1992) but I imagine it is extremely simple to use. Even the 3D stuff will abstract the details and leave you needing just a little 3D theory and Math to understand the 3D side of things. I'm not sure if it has built in collision libraries but if you are using 3D the collision and physics are a big part of it - more so than the rendering imo - and a lot harder to get "right" - if it provides an abstraction for that then it will be a very useful tool for prototyping or even full games (if they are optimised well).

    good luck
     
    #7 Sharpfish, Apr 23, 2005
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2005
  8. Reactor

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Thanks guys, the info is much appreciated.
     
  9. Uhfgood

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    I personally don't recommend the blitz irc channels (#blitzbasic and #blitzcoder) most of the time those guys won't really help you, instead they'll tell you to try it. However there are a few guys in there that would help you out with problems. If you have errors in your code, they can help with that, but usually I only use the blitz irc channels as a last resort. You actually get much quicker responses with the forums.

    And as for Code Complete, it practically ruined me. Before I would just do stuff and be happy that it worked, now i'm so worried about access functions, and naming my functions and variables, that I barely get any code done. I guess it will be ok if you are a beginner as you would learn this from the start, but coming from someone who used to program differently, until he read code complete... The principles are sound, and the author is a software engineer so he knows what he's talking about, however, if you are just by yourself or a small group of people then it's trouble ;-)
     

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