A Game That Sells

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by ProgrammingFreak, Apr 6, 2007.

  1. ProgrammingFreak

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey Guys,

    I was wondering what kinda of game sells. I know most any type of game will sell. But what is the most popular, the easiest to make that sells.
     
  2. soniCron

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3,664
    Likes Received:
    0
    Definitely mmo first-person shooters with micro-transactions. They're the future!
     
  3. PoV

    PoV
    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Messages:
    2,132
    Likes Received:
    0
    Do your homework, there'll be a quiz later.
     
  4. bignobody

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2005
    Messages:
    387
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you do find out what it is, make sure to tell us. :)
     
  5. DanMarshall

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gibbage, obviously.
     
  6. TeeGee

    TeeGee New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mostly the good ones.
     
  7. Nexic

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2004
    Messages:
    2,437
    Likes Received:
    0
    Honestly if you want quick money with little work you should get into another industry fast.

    The path of least resistance is probably making a Jewel Quest or MCF clone. But in most cases these games do nothing for long term survival, they don't age well. Why buy a 3 year old game when it's already been redone 50 times with better graphics?

    My advice to your is not to even look for the quick fix. Expect to spend at least 2 years making zero cash before becomming successful.
     
  8. TunaBreeze

    TunaBreeze New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you want to be a successful developer you need to not only have a good game behind you but a good business strategy. One thing you should focus on is making an engine that is highly flexible so that you can not only use it for your game but expand upon it for expansions, sequals, and other games entirely. Also focus on making a franchise. There's far more money in games that have sequals and expansion packs than there are single titles. The reason being is that your development time is shorter (on expansions and sequals) and you are selling to people who have already bought your game, and those loyal to your franchise are more likely to recommend a series that has been around for a while than a single title.
     
  9. ProgrammingFreak

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the help, I'll do that.
     
  10. ragdollsoft

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    You need to have an idea.

    If you have a great idea, you might make a great game. Without one, its hard.
     
  11. ProgrammingFreak

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have tons of ideas, its just hard because I'm not good with the graphics
     
  12. Uesugi

    Uesugi New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    Lots of us are no good with graphics. Use placeholder graphics (colored circles, squares, triangles, etc.) and then swap in better ones later. (You can pay someone if you have to, or buy an artpack like those that ArtGirl makes.)

    Your first games should be simple, so you get an idea of how everything fits together. You can easily swap in better graphics for something like a Pong clone later.
     
  13. Escapee

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2005
    Messages:
    740
    Likes Received:
    0
    MCF type of game as evident in bigfish top 3 games, but i guess it's going to get overcrowded ( like match 3 games) very soon and bore the hell out of casual gamers with the same gameplay. Others that i would recommend are casual sim and RPG (eg : Aveyond) .

    Agree with others about the importance of game art in casual game market.

    The above is just my personal opinion
     
  14. ProgrammingFreak

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    I get it, use simple graphics to test for collision detection and such and then improve them with better graphics
     
  15. TunaBreeze

    TunaBreeze New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm also using place holder graphics. I purchased a pack of 25 models for about $30, definitely makes the development experience more interesting than using basic shapes.
     
  16. RinkuHero

    RinkuHero New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Messages:
    673
    Likes Received:
    1
    Match-3 puzzle games with colorful graphics. However, don't expect much prestige if you make games like those; they're the Thomas Kinkade of games.
     
  17. TeeGee

    TeeGee New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    0
    I wouldn't say that match-3 are easiest to make now. Sure they are simple and fun, but market is so overcrowded with them (and most of them are of top-notch quality), that you would have to make your game really good to break through.
     
  18. RinkuHero

    RinkuHero New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Messages:
    673
    Likes Received:
    1
    True, but I think that even a mediocre match-3 game would sell better than an excellent original game. I've seen some really great games on Manifesto Games that only sold like 10 copies.
     
  19. Escapee

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2005
    Messages:
    740
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think a mediocre match 3 game would most likely sell ~ 0 copy now .. (no kidding)
     
  20. KNau

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Messages:
    1,165
    Likes Received:
    2
    This is where the "business 101" thinking needs to come into play. If you can't do great graphics then don't compete in a graphics heavy genre. If programming is your thing then make a game that's process-complex, not render-complex. There's always vector graphics, if the gameplay is fun then the graphics don't matter so much. People are willing to play as a glowing triangle if the game is really fun, if it's not fun then you'd better hook up with an artist to pre-render some fancy 3D sprites.
     

Share This Page

  • About Indie Gamer

    When the original Dexterity Forums closed in 2004, Indie Gamer was born and a diverse community has grown out of a passion for creating great games. Here you will find over 10 years of in-depth discussion on game design, the business of game development, and marketing/sales. Indie Gamer also provides a friendly place to meet up with other Developers, Artists, Composers and Writers.
  • Buy us a beer!

    Indie Gamer is delicately held together by a single poor bastard who thankfully gets help from various community volunteers. If you frequent this site or have found value in something you've learned here, help keep the site running by donating a few dollars (for beer of course)!

    Sure, I'll Buy You a Beer