3D modelling on a Mac

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by Jamie W, Jan 30, 2010.

  1. Jamie W

    Original Member Indie Author

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    I'm looking for something to create and texture some 3d models. I won't need to do fancy animations etc; do something that's more focused on just the modeling will do me fine..

    I tried Blender; and keep going back to it; but it's not too intuitive or easy to learn etc (though version 2.5 looks promising). So, aside from Blender; any recommendations for 3d modeling software that will run on a Mac?
     
  2. barrygamer

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  3. Julio Gorge

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    Wings 3D is a simple modeling package that runs on all major operating systems: http://www.wings3d.com/

    There are plenty of video tutorials on Youtube.
     
  4. Emmanuel

    Moderator Original Member

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    Definitely Cinema4D, it's not cheap but if you want to create art for commercial games it's fantastic. Check out Serpent of Isis for a hit casual game made with c4d/ptk on a Mac.

    A piece I made with C4D: here.

    Best regards,
    Emmanuel
     
  5. CasualInsider

    CasualInsider New Member

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  6. ragdollsoft

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  7. Bad Sector

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    Blender :p

    Yes i know, you tried it, but i hardly recommend that you stick to trying it - it isn't that hard, its probably that you've used other apps at the past. In the long run you'll be thanking me :p.
     
  8. JarkkoL

    JarkkoL New Member

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    +1 for modo. It's good for the price, though somewhat unstable and lacks editable history stack. Replicators are neat for distributing objects, but unfortunately you can't get the data out from modo yet ):
     
  9. elias4444

    elias4444 New Member

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    I guess you need to look at your budget. Modo, Cinema4D, and the other pay-for software are excellent, so long as you have a thousand dollars to spare.

    Personally, I spent the time and learned Blender. Is it the easiest software? Definitely not, but it can be learned, and the tutorials are free (as opposed to paying $30 to $100 bucks a pop just to see how to do something). It's constantly improving, and is more than adequate for what you're trying to do.

    If you decide to purchase one, make sure you download and use the trials a bit before you buy anything. Cheetah is a reasonably priced one for an indie, but I'm not sure it's any easier than blender (I haven't used it, and I can't even watch the tutorial on their website without paying for it).
     
  10. PoV

    PoV
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    You're going to be let down by anything that isn't Blender. Others may offer a better modeling interface, but they're not complete packages like Blender (except maybe Cinema4D).

    The Blender workflow is hotkey driven, but today all options can be found on menus. You also want a 3 button mouse when working in Blender.

    I imagine you're a technical guy, so tutorials are just a waste of time. Here some workflow notes I took whist working on a project last year. Some stuff is stupid (need for enter key), which is why I wrote this.

    1. Getting Started
    2. Map Modeling
    3. Subdivision
    4. Texturing

    The notes are for my own game tech and computer setup, but should still useful getting started. The subject is map making, but character modeling would expand on this (bones).
     
  11. Jamie W

    Original Member Indie Author

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    Thanks everyone. I've been checking out Cheetah3D which, first impressions are pretty good. I'm still torn about Blender though; I've been using 2.49 and the interface isn't so nice, but; I've also had a look at 2.50 and it's a BIG improvement (though it's still in Alpha).

    I would have thought I should be able to get my head around Blender, without too many head-aches (I did great at school in tech drawing, umm, maybe I'm just getting old). I'll check out PoV's articles anyhoo (thanks PoV) and may just wait for Blender 2.5...

    All I want it to create some low poly models, for rendering as sprites etc (cars and street furniture etc to begin with).
     
  12. Bad Sector

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    Blender 2.5 is usuable, but some tools from 2.49 are missing. However i recommend to try Blender 2.5 alpha 0, or if you feel adventurous (ie. don't mind saving every 5 minutes :p) download a SVN build from graphicall.org.

    There are some differences that might confuse you if you learn 2.49 now. Try to use 2.5, which anyway has greater usability. Personally i use 2.49 only when i want to use a feature that is missing from 2.5 (rare but some aren't ported over yet). Fortunately Blender was always about compatibility so you can work most of the time in 2.5 and use 2.49 only when needed.

    And btw, also try to learn the keys. Its much faster using the keys. To quote a 3D artist friend of mine after recently trying Blender (for 2nd or 3rd time - for some reason few people "get" Blender the first time), "using the keys is so much faster, i heard about it many times before but i thought that wasn't such a big deal, 3ds max has shortcuts too.". Or something like that, it was about six days ago :p.

    Ah, 2nd "btw". Another reason to use 2.5 is that the script API has changed. You'll need scripts to export the rendered images (unless you plan to do it by hand, but its *painful*). When i was testing a 2D isometric engine, i wrote a script in Blender that create an isometric camera in correct position above the model and rendered and exported the object in several files by rotating the object in 45 degrees and playing back its animation. Unfortunately this script was for 2.49 and i'm don't know yet much of the new API, although i would like to try to rewrite it for 2.5 :p.
     

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