3D characters- Poser/DAZ or 3D Max/Maya?

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by DaveGilbert, Aug 13, 2010.

  1. Mattias Gustavsson

    Original Member

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    Well, first thing you should do is change the cameras focal setting to 0 - this is a special override that makes the camera orthogonal, which is very useful when rendering for iso games - especially if you're rendering larger objects. Then you just tilt the camera 30 degrees down, and rotate it 45 degrees, to get the isometric angle.

    For lights, I usually use only two - one image-based light, for ambience, and one directional light, for main light+shadow. Make sure to turn ambient occlusion on for the IBL light, and use "Ray trace shadows" on the main light - set blur radius at your preference.

    For render settings, use the firefly renderer, and on "auto settings", drag it up so it at least gets raytracing enabled, but higher gives better quality.

    After rendering, load it up in an image editor and adjust brightness/contrast - I usually increase contrast by 20%, and brightness so it looks good. Sometimes I sharpen the image.

    When using the old poser renderer, I used to render at twice the size, but I don't think it's necessary with firefly - better to just up the quality setting a bit.

    This is how I do my renders, and I'm quite happy with the result, so maybe it can serve as a starting point for others as well...
     
  2. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    I've used Daz3D in the past but just to add...

    Aside from any ambient lighting, I always use two additional directional lights. One as the main light source, and another pointing in the opposite direction to the main light source (so its basically behind and to the right of the game character). This gives a backlight and takes the 'flatness' out of any areas that would otherwise only be lit by ambient light.

    Also, rather than white lights I always prefer a very pale yellow light as it gives a more natural look.
     
  3. DaveGilbert

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    We are rendering our environments in Cararra, so we generally import our Poser/Daz models into Carrara and export the frames from there to maintain consistency.
     
  4. ManuelMarino

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    If there's not much for 1930 backgrounds, I suggest hiring a 3D artist.

    There are so many in this board, it's easy to find the right person for this job.

    I think that spending time to learn a new software or creating models oneself is frustrating and it's much better to create a long term relationship with a professional.

    When I don't work on music, I relax myself with 3D art or painting. But I would hire a professional, having a game in mind to produce.
     
  5. kys01212

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    Thanks so much about the ambient occlusion setting for lighting. It works out great and I don't have to render it in max anymore :)

    Kevin
     
  6. DaveGilbert

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    In case anyone was wondering, here's a little sample of our editor in action:

    [​IMG]

    Correct size scaling is for the weak.
     

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