3-d game design

Discussion in 'Game Design' started by kingpin55, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. kingpin55

    kingpin55 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    HI it's me again......... now i need some advice on what game engines or other 3-d game creation tools that are low costing or free ....
     
  2. anpd

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2009
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    Depending on what you are planning to do there are lot´s of options. Unity is free and easy to use. UDK has just been released but might be abit to much if you are planning something smaller. And checkout Ogre3D and Leadwerks.
     
  3. charliedog

    charliedog New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2007
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hmm. Having recently got started making a 3D game at home after doing a few 2D it's struck me that whilst the game engine is important so is all the other stuff that goes with it. Your going to need:

    A good easy to use 3D editor
    Texturing tool
    Animation tool
    2D art tool
    Sound editing tool
    Reasonable degree of skill in all the above
    good tool chain and straightforward way to get art into the game- Unity is pretty good in this regard

    All cost money unless you go for the freeware stuff which is generally either poorly specc'd or difficult to use.

    The 3D engine is just the tip of the iceberg unfortunately...

    So my advise is to make sure that whatever engine you pick has support for a number of tools and lets you get your art into it really easily. I think that's a possible downside for Ogre but I've not used it so can't really comment.
     
  4. anpd

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2009
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    There is a program called Ultimate Unwrap 3d that is really good at converting between different file formats. I have had much use for it when I have worked with 3d.
     
  5. KNau

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Messages:
    1,165
    Likes Received:
    2
    Well, the Unreal Development Kit is free. You can release non-commercial games for free but have to get a license if you want to sell your game. On the other hand if you create a commercially viable game, chances are you can get the money for a license pretty easily.

    The question is, what kind of game are you making? There is no one tool that's perfect for everything.
     
  6. Game Producer

    Moderator Original Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    2
    NeoAxis comes to my mind. I think there was some freeish thing.

    Unity also offers something.

    I'm using Leadwerks (not free though, and it's in development)

    Blitz3d is pretty nice :)

    P.S. Something slightly wrong with your signature... :eek:
     
  7. Scurvy Lobster

    Scurvy Lobster New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2007
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    0
    FPS Creator can be good for beginners and if you don't have programming skills.

    I have had a lot of fun making FPS games with it and don't mind that they are a bit generic.
     
  8. GhostRik

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    The inevitable "Blender's free" mention.

    Rik
     
  9. Asvarduil

    Asvarduil New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm using Unity. While the documentation on scripting is...ummm...ethereal?...the engine is more centered toward assembling assets, like code, sound, and graphics. It's possible to piece together small 3D games really quickly, provided you can figure out the API (which, to me, isn't truly tough, it's just tedious having to go check their Support section every few minutes.)
     

Share This Page

  • About Indie Gamer

    When the original Dexterity Forums closed in 2004, Indie Gamer was born and a diverse community has grown out of a passion for creating great games. Here you will find over 10 years of in-depth discussion on game design, the business of game development, and marketing/sales. Indie Gamer also provides a friendly place to meet up with other Developers, Artists, Composers and Writers.
  • Buy us a beer!

    Indie Gamer is delicately held together by a single poor bastard who thankfully gets help from various community volunteers. If you frequent this site or have found value in something you've learned here, help keep the site running by donating a few dollars (for beer of course)!

    Sure, I'll Buy You a Beer